8 Edible Flowers and Their Photos

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Edible Flowers and Their Photos

From Bloom to Plate: Growing and Enjoying Edible Flowers

Edible flowers, with their vibrant colors and unique flavors, have gained popularity in the culinary world. Growing these flowers organically not only adds beauty to your garden but also ensures a safe, chemical-free addition to your meals. This guide provides a comprehensive overview of various edible flowers, focusing on their organic cultivation and characteristics.

Contents

1. Nasturtiums: The Spicy Blossoms

nasturtium

Nasturtiums, with their bright orange, yellow, and red flowers, are a garden favorite. They grow easily from seed, typically maturing in 35-52 days. Nasturtium plants can spread up to 2 feet wide and 18 inches tall. Their peppery-tasting flowers and leaves add a zesty flavor to salads.

2. Calendula: The Healing Flower

Orange and Yellow Calendula Flashback
Orange and Yellow Calendula Flashback

Calendula, known for its vibrant yellow and orange petals, has a slightly peppery taste. These plants reach about 12-24 inches in height and flower about 50-60 days after planting. Calendula is renowned for its medicinal properties and adds a golden hue to dishes.

3. Borage: Starry Blue Edibles

Borage flowers

Borage produces beautiful star-shaped blue flowers with a mild cucumber flavor. Growing up to 2-3 feet tall, borage flowers about 50-60 days after sowing. The flowers make a charming addition to drinks and salads.

4. Violas: Sweet and Colorful

Grow bag violas at Northfield Bridge Square

Violas, including pansies and Johnny-jump-ups, have a sweet, grassy flavor. These petite flowers grow about 6-8 inches tall and bloom quickly, usually within 40-50 days of planting. They are perfect for garnishing desserts and salads.

5. Chive Flowers: Oniony and Aromatic

chive flowers

The purple-pink flowers of chives are not just pretty but also have a delicate onion flavor. Chive plants can grow up to 12-15 inches and typically flower in late spring or early summer. The flowers are a beautiful addition to savory dishes.

6. Lavender: Aromatic and Elegant

lavender

Lavender, known for its soothing aroma, has flowers with a sweet, floral flavor with lemon and citrus notes. Lavender plants can reach up to 24 inches tall and usually flower in late spring to early summer. The flowers are great in desserts and drinks.

7. Rose Petals: Classic and Romantic

rose flowers on cake

Roses, the epitome of edible flowers, have petals with a sweet, aromatic flavor. The size varies greatly among varieties, but many garden roses will grow about 3-5 feet tall. Rose petals are perfect for jams, teas, and baking.

8. Marigold: The Peppery Bloom

edible marigolds

Marigold flowers, particularly the Tagetes variety, have a spicy, citrusy taste. They can grow up to 18 inches tall and flower about 45-50 days after sowing. The petals can be sprinkled on salads or used as a garnish.

9. Organic Cultivation Tips

Growing edible flowers organically requires well-drained, fertile soil and regular watering. Avoid synthetic fertilizers and pesticides; instead, opt for organic compost and natural pest control methods. Plant in a sunny location and ensure good air circulation to prevent disease.

10. Harvesting and Usage

Harvest edible flowers in the morning when their oils are most concentrated. Rinse gently and use them fresh for the best flavor. They can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days in a container lined with a damp paper towel.

Conclusion

Edible flowers, when grown organically, can transform a simple dish into a work of art, offering a feast for the eyes and the palate. With their varied flavors and stunning appearances, they not only enhance the beauty of your garden but also bring creativity and freshness to your cooking. By understanding the characteristics and cultivation needs of each flower, you can enjoy the dual delights of gardening and gourmet cooking, organically and sustainably.

Best 20 Gardening Jokes: A Harvest of Humor

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Best 20 Gardening Jokes

20 Jokes about Gardening

Here’s a great list of the best 20 Gardening Jokes. Gardening is not just a hobby; it’s a lifestyle, a passion that cultivates more than just plants—it nurtures a sense of humor too. As any gardener will tell you, laughter is like fertilizer for the soul. In this light-hearted exploration, we’ll dig into a delightful bed of jokes tailored for those who till the soil, sow seeds, and find joy in the simple wonders of their green havens.

1. The Soil’s Perspective: Why did the soil blush?

Because the gardener was raking it over!

Gardening starts from the ground up, and even the soil can’t escape a good-natured jest.

2. Talking to Plants: Why do gardeners make terrible comedians?

Because their jokes are too corny, and the plants can’t stand the bad delivery!

Gardeners often share their secrets with their leafy companions, but maybe they need to work on their stand-up routine.

3. The Tomato’s Secret: Why was the tomato blushing?

Because it saw the salad dressing!

In the world of vegetables, tomatoes have a saucy sense of humor.

4. The Green Thumb Dilemma: What do you call a gardener who doesn’t use pesticides?

An exterminator.

Sometimes, the battle against garden pests requires a bit of wordplay.

5. Garden Planning Woes: Why do gardeners never plan?

Because they like to “plant” the idea that they’re spontaneous!

Gardeners might not always follow a rigid plan; they prefer to let the garden grow organically.

6. Weeding Wisdom: Why did the gardener break up with the compost?

It wasn’t working out—they needed space!

Even in composting, relationships can get a little messy.

7. The Plant’s Complaint: Why do plants hate math?

It gives them square roots!

Plants might excel in photosynthesis, but calculus is a bit out of their league.

8. The Zen Gardener: What did the meditating gardener say?

“Ommm… I need more mulch.”

Even in moments of tranquility, a gardener’s mind is never far from the needs of the garden.

9. Garden Tools Unleashed: Why did the rake go to therapy?

It had too many issues with its teeth.

Garden tools may have a tough exterior, but they too can be a little sensitive.

10. The Fruit’s Perspective: What’s the orange’s favorite gardening tool?

The zester!

When it comes to citrus fruits, zest is best, especially in the garden.

11. The Confession: Why did the gardener break up with the sun?

It was getting too hot!

Even the sun can be a bit intense for a relationship.

12. Gardening in Space: What do you call a gardening astronaut?

An astro-plant-er.

Gardeners dream of reaching new heights, even if it’s among the stars.

13. The Competition: Why did the gardener always carry a pencil?

To draw their plants!

In the world of gardening, even artistry plays a role.

14. The Tomato Family Secret: Why was the little tomato upset?

Because it couldn’t ketchup with the rest of the family!

In the tomato family, speed is key.

15. The Ultimate Gardener’s Dilemma: What did the gardener say to the snail?

“You’re not welcome in my garden!”

Snails might be slow, but gardeners are swift in protecting their prized blooms.

16. The Gardener’s Lament: Why did the gardener become a musician?

Because he had the perfect pitch, but his plants were still flat!

Even in the garden, musical aspirations can blossom.

17. The Floral Conundrum: Why did the rose go to school?

It wanted to be a little “bloom-smarter”!

In the garden of knowledge, every flower aspires to grow wiser.

18. The Vegetable Rebellion: Why did the cucumber hide?

It saw the salad dressing, and things were about to get dicey!

Even vegetables can have a rebellious side.

19. The Philosophical Tomato: What did the tomato say to the other vegetables?

“Ketchup, everyone—it’s time for a salad symphony!”

In the world of veggies, tomatoes often take on the role of the maestro.

20. The Garden Party Invitation: Why do gardeners make great party hosts?

Because they know how to throw a bloomin’ good time!

Gardeners not only cultivate plants but also the art of hosting delightful gatherings.

20 Gardening Jokes Conclusion

Gardening is not just about nurturing plants; it’s about cultivating joy, laughter, and a spirit of camaraderie with the natural world. These jokes are a gentle reminder that in the realm of gardens, a good sense of humor is as essential as water and sunshine. So, share a laugh with your fellow gardeners, and may your harvest be bountiful, both in vegetables and in smiles!

Check out MEG’s Instant Gardens here.

Experiment With Growing Food

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Experiment with new plant like this Cinnamon Basil Plant

Contents

Grow Your Own Food Part 3: Experiment

1. New Growing Methods

Have you ever driven by a farm and wondered what the caterpillar looking tunnel was? Maybe you saw an interesting container and thought about trying to grow your favorite tomato variety in it next season. Experimenting with new growing methods is a fantastic way to broaden your skill base and gain confidence in growing food.

Examples of growing methods to experiment with:

  1. Container gardening with grow bags
  2. Raised beds
  3. Aquaponic and Hydroponic growing

2. Lengthening The Growing Season

The running joke in Minnesota is “There are two seasons—winter and road construction”. All jokes aside, the opportunity to grow food during the Minnesota summer can be ridiculously short. We’re in zone 4b which means there are roughly 150-ish frost-free days during the growing season. This means, most heat-loving plants have to be started indoors and transplanted outdoors like hot peppers which sometimes require 120+ days to mature fully. There are ways to extend the season here in Minnesota. Starting seeds indoors is one method. By experimenting with this method or others, you can lengthen your growing season even in a colder environment like Minnesota.

Examples of season-lengthening methods:

  1. Cold Frame (insulated wood box with glass on top)
  2. Hoop house ( caterpillar tunnel)
  3. Green house or hot house

3. Controls for pests and diseases

Growing food can feel liberating but can also feel gut wrenching. All the hard work put into a garden can be undone quickly by little insects who seem to think they deserve to eat your plants more than you. Heard of aphids or Japanese beetles? These are just a couple of insect species that can cause major damage in an edible garden if left unchecked.

There is hope though! Insects like these can motivate you to experiment with different methods for controlling these pesky insects. We are partial to mechanical barriers for controlling insects at our plant nursery. Floating row covers are one such barrier that masks and maintains a physical barrier denying access by many insects and pests.

Examples of pest controls to experiment with:

  1. floating row covers for insects
  2. chicken wire for dogs and bunnies
  3. sticky traps and galvanized steel hardware cloth for mice

Final Thoughts

Experimenting is one of the best parts of growing food. What will your try experimenting with this growing season?

MEG’s Edible Landscapes

MEG is continuing to add new and exciting products to the lineup every year. This year, we’re adding more than half a dozen new hot and mild pepper varieties alone plus special projects like Operation Cup of Joe!

Have you checked MEG’s new CSA starting this Spring? We had requests for CSA memberships last year and thought “why not”? It’s a brilliant idea coupled with MEG’s tried and true method using grow bags. Our automated watering system is complimentary to each CSA package this year too! No more worrying about watering plants. We’re taking that chore off your plate. Check out the basic membership here. Don’t delay, we only have 20 CSA memberships available for 2023!

Keep growing!

Andy

MEG’s Dad and Founder

Scotch Bonnet Peppers For The Best Flavored Hot Sauce

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Scotch Bonnet Jamaica Yellow Pepper Seed Packet

Contents

Scotch Bonnet

Have you heard of Scotch Bonnet Peppers before? Or, have you seen the Netflix show The American Barbecue Showdown? Rasheed Philips, runner up winner for the season, used Scotch Bonnet Peppers to add a spicy kick to his barbecue dishes. We’re eager to grow these out this summer to not only taste these lovely hot peppers but to also perform a side-by-side taste test with habanero peppers. This is the first year growing these for MEG, and from what we hear, they’re as hot as habaneros but sweeter!

Recipes

Scotch Bonnet Peppers are native to the Caribbean and West Africa. They’re popular in hot sauces and Jamaican jerk dishes. Here are a couple recipes featuring these beautiful peppers:

Jamaican Jerk Chicken

Easy recipe. We plan on using our smoker to prepare this recipe later this summer.

Jamaican Rice and Beans

If you like rice and beans, try this recipe. Easy to follow and has a little bite from scotch bonnet peppers.

MEG’s Edible Landscapes

MEG is continuing to add new and exciting products to the lineup every year. This year, we’re adding more than half a dozen new hot and mild pepper varieties alone. We’re unveiling these over the next few weeks. As of this post, we’re roughly half way through the new pepper lineup!

Besides adding awesome new pepper varieties to the lineup this year, have you checked our new CSA starting this Spring? We had requests for CSA memberships last year and thought “why not”? It’s a brilliant idea coupled with MEG’s tried and true method using grow bags. Our automated watering system is complimentary to each CSA package this year too! No more worrying about watering plants. We’re taking that chore off your plate. Check out the basic membership here. Don’t delay, we only have 20 CSA memberships available for 2023!

Final Thoughts

Scotch Bonnet peppers are a great choice for a hot pepper with a sweet flavor. Cheers to a great pepper growing year!

Trinidad Moruga Scorpian: Former Ultimate Hot Pepper Of The World

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Contents

Trinidad Moruga Scorpian Peppers

Today’s program has been brought to you by the letter “T” for Trinidad Moruga Scoprian Pepper. That’s a little throw back to Sesame Street as well as a shout out to MEG’s new pepper addition for 2023. Have we lost our minds? Well, maybe a little, but we always love trying something new. The Trinidad Moruga Scorpian Pepper hails from its native home of ….. Moruga, Trinidad and Tobago.

The Consensus with Trinidad Moruga Scorpian Peppers

It’s freaking hot! The average Scorpion Pepper weighs in at 1.2 MILLION Scoville Heat Units. Is it hot enough to melt sand into glass? Probably not, but this pepper definitely is not skimping on the Capsaicin (you know, the chemical known for making you cry when you eat those beloved hot wings!).


C18H27NO3
Chemical Structure of Capsaicin

Although it’s never entered the Guinness Book of World Records as the hottest pepper in the world, it was certified as the hottest pepper by the New Mexico State University Chili Pepper Institute in 2012. Did you know there was such a thing as a Chili Pepper Institute? Neat! Their mission is to serve as a research institute for all things chili pepper related.

MEG’s Edible Landscapes

MEG is continuing to add new and exciting products to the lineup every year. This year, we’re adding more than half a dozen new hot pepper varieties alone. Those will be unveiled in the coming month. As Glen Frey would say, “The heat is on”! Gen X, you know what we’re saying!

Besides adding awesome new pepper varieties to the lineup this year, have you checked our new CSA starting this Spring? We had requests for CSA memberships last year and thought “why not”? It’s a brilliant idea coupled with MEG’s tried and true method using grow bags. Our automated watering system is complimentary to each CSA package this year too! No more worrying about watering plants. We’re taking that chore off your plate. Check out the basic membership here. Don’t delay, we only have 20 CSA memberships available for 2023!

Final Thoughts

Well, the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Pepper is just pure heat. We can’t wait to see this beautiful plant grow out this summer in Minnesota!